FutureLegalLegends – Legendary Advice

 

 

LEGENDARY ADVICE

 

Throughout this year we’re seeking out current and future legal legends to pass on any stories about their time at University, any advice which they may have for current law students or any blog posts written by them which may interest law students.

 

For law students, it’s also a way for us to help big you up, post your content online and get your name out there. If you would like to contribute a blog or answer our hard hitting questions, feel free to get in touch here.

 

If a post does interest you, feel free to continue the conversation or debate in the comments section below.

 


 
 

SHAHAB UDDIN

 

Shahab Uddin is Head of Legal at the British Olympic Association and a non-executive director at Sports Resolution (UK). Shahab has advised on a range of issues relating to selection and appeals policies leading up to and during the course of London 2012. As in-house counsel, Shahab also advises on a broad range of commercial sponsorship, intellectual property, licensing and anti-doping matters. Before joining the British Olympic Association, Shahab worked in the corporate group at Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer.

 

 
Where did you study law?
College of Law, Store Street, London

 

 

Could you tell us a bit about your career journey towards becoming Head of Legal at the British Olympic Association?
Trainee and Associate at Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer (2005-2009), Legal Counsel, Senior Lawyer to Head of Legal at British Olympic Association (2010- present).

 

 

Can you give us some insight into what being head of legal at the British Olympic Association involves?
No one day is the same. The range of work is varied, from drafting a sponsorship agreement to dealing with misuse of Olympic intellectual property in the United Kingdom to looking at sports selection policies for the Olympic Games to being at the Olympic Games.

 

 

What’s the best part of your job?
I got to experience the London 2012 Olympic Games from the inside and also got to be at the 2014 Olympic Winter Games. I will go to the Rio 2016 Olympic Games as Head of Legal for Team GB which I am excited about. Being invited to the Queen’s Garden Party in Buckingham Palace after London 2012 was pretty cool.

 

 

What do you enjoy most about being an in-house counsel?
The flexibility it gives me to manage my own workload. Not recording time and working for an organisation and movement I am passionate about.

 

 

What made you choose a career in law?
I had studied some law modules as part of my undergraduate degree. After my undergraduate degree I went and lived in Japan for two years. This gave me time to think about what I wanted to do. I decided to come back and give law a go, however, I wasn’t convinced until I actually started studying it.

 

 

What was the thing(s) you loved most about studying law?
This might sound geeky, but some of the case law we studied was really fascinating. It kept things interesting and allowed you to engage more with the debate on how some of the legal principles in this country have evolved.

 

 

What did you dread or dislike most about studying law?
A lot of it is an exercise in memory, you have to learn a lot for a very short period of time to get you through your exams. The idea that you could turn up for your exams and forget everything keeps you awake at night.

 

 

Apart from a degree, what did you take away from studying law?
I met some brilliant people – some of my now closest friends are from law school. I also learnt that being a student in central London is very expensive. I also discovered the M&S chocolate cookie on Tottenham Court Road. If you get there early enough it’s still warm.

 

 

If you had the chance, what would have you done more of or less of back at University?
More work.

 

 

If you couldn’t be a lawyer, what would you be doing?
A sportsman, but not sure that’s what I’d be doing now given the career span of sports people.

 

 

Do you have a favourite anecdote from your time as a law student?
I didn’t realise I needed a training contract until I was almost finished with my first year at law school. There was some mild panic as I was starting the LPC to get a training contract. Luckily Freshfields came to the rescue and I had the best time there.

 

 

Do you have any tips or advice for current undergraduates?
Law firms and recruiters are not only looking for people with good grades, they are also looking for people who are personable and have other experiences. Go and have lots of experiences that will help you be an all round good lawyer.

 

Do you have any advice to offer? Email us your interest here.

 

 
 


 
 

IAIN MORLEY

 

This week we chat to Iain Morley QC, from 23 Essex Street Chambers. Iain is a seasoned advocate, whose practice encompasses both domestic and international criminal law, with emphasis upon complex casework, including financial crime. He is known to present multiplicities of facts clearly and subtle arguments persuasively.

Since 2004, Iain has become a well-known figure on the international circuit, practicing in genocide, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and international terrorism. He has appeared and taught in 26 jursidictions.

 

 
Where did you study law?
Oxford.

 

 

Could you tell us a bit about your career in law?
27 years Call, Silk since 2009, in domestic and international criminal law, have appeared and taught in 27 jurisdictions.

 

 

What made you choose a career in law?
My father wanted me to be an accountant – naturally I rebelled and became a lawyer.

 

 

What was the thing(s) you love most about law school?
Drinking and debating.

 

 

What do you dread or dislike most about law school?
Law books.
 

 

Apart from a degree, what did you take away from studying law?
World Universities Debating Champion.

 

 

If you had the chance, what would have you done more of or less of back at University?
I would have done an LLM at Harvard or Stanford – and then maybe tried war journalism. More reading great English litt, less talking.

 

 

Many students these day can relate to eating a lot of supermarket frozen pizza and ready meals. What food was your staple food and what did the contents of your fridge look like when at University?
I ate the random food of others in the fridge, and blamed missing food on those studying PPE.

 

 

Was there any time when you felt that law school wasn’t for you and maybe that you should try something else?
Every day.

 

 

Do you have a favourite anecdote from your time as a law student?
I recall my tutor in Roman Law telling me I had the vacant mind of a Jumblie from the Lear’s famous nonsense poem, and we both laughed a lot.

 

 

Do you have any tips or advice for current undergraduates?
Stick with it – the study of law may dry the mind, but its practice is fantastic.

 

 

Finally, for our short film ‘here’s to you’ we featured three student heroes – a competitive student, a studious student, and a procrastinator – which character did you most relate to while studying?
None of the above – I was a merely curious and mostly wrong.

 

Do you have any advice to offer? Email us your interest here.

 

 
 


 
 

DANIEL GREENBERG

 

First up we chat to author, editor and ex-Parliamentary Counsel, Daniel Greenberg. Daniel has a broad practice dealing with legislation, including drafting new legislation and amendments to legislation, and advising on statutory application and interpretation throughout a number of practice areas. He advises clients on the production and handling of amendments to Government Bills, on influencing and obtaining secondary legislation, and on Parliamentary procedure and machinery of government.

 

 
Where did you study law?
Trinity College, Cambridge; and the Inns of Court School of Law.

 

 

Could you tell us a bit about your career in law?

I joined the Lord Chancellor’s Department straight from pupillage in 1988; becoming increasingly interested in legislation, I was appointed to the Parliamentary Counsel Office in 1991 and remained there until 2010, drafting Acts of Parliament about more or less any and every subject, including tax, crime, environmental law and constitutional law. Highlights included working on the Good Friday agreement in Northern Ireland and on devolution in 1997 and 1998. While still in Government service I began to pursue an interest in writing and publishing, starting with Stroud’s Judicial Dictionary in 1995 and moving on to producing new editions of Craies on Legislation and Jowitt’s Judicial Dictionary; I became the General Editor of Westlaw Annotated Statutes in 2009, a post I still hold, and I combine it now with being General Editor of the Insight Encyclopaedia. In 2010 I left the Parliamentary Counsel Office, and I now have a part-time appointment as a legal adviser to the Speaker of the House of Commons, where I particularly serve the Joint Committee on Statutory Instruments, a part-time consultancy in the City law firm of Berwin Leighton Paisner LLP where I advise on statutory compliance and legislation generally, and an international and UK drafting and training practice which has taken me to Myanmar, Malaysia, Gibraltar, the Falkland Islands and elsewhere, and frequently takes me to Belfast and Cardiff.

 

 

What made you choose a career in law?

I was – and still am – completely hopeless at everything else. Test-tubes burst as soon as look at me, I can’t add up, and nobody could see any possible career for me unless I could somehow find a way to monetise a combination of pig-headed stubbornness and a love of arguing with everyone about everything. Hence the law.

 

 

What was the thing(s) you love most about law school?

Contract law – because I had the most wonderful teacher, Professor Charles Hamson QC. He was rather old by the time I went to Cambridge, and he used to fall asleep after about 20 minutes. So some of the more ambitious students demanded a replacement and were accommodated with a recent and brilliant graduate. I stayed on and learned more about contract law in 20 minutes than I learned about any of the other subjects in an hour.

 

 

What do you dread or dislike most about law school?

The bits you had to be clever for: equity, private international law and land law – I will never understand anything about any of them.

 

 

Apart from a degree, what did you take away from studying law?

A sense of public responsibility: there is no other profession (including politics, which shouldn’t be a profession anyway) which is more critical to the preservation of a functioning and fair democracy.

 

 

If you had the chance, what would have you done more of or less of back at University?

I would have taken more advantage of opportunities to meet and listen to great women and men who had already achieved much; and I would have gone to lectures, at least occasionally (even then it was extremely silly not to – and it would be professional suicide today).

 

 

What food was your staple food and what did the contents of your fridge look like when at University?

I maintained a carefully balanced diet of bread, butter, marmite, eggs and crisps; but mostly crisps.

 

 

Was there any time when you felt that law school wasn’t for you and maybe that you should try something else?

I honestly have never thought for a moment that I should do anything else.

 

 

Do you have a favourite anecdote from your time as a law student?

Doing work experience with a local law firm in London, being sent to a non-opposed costs application, finding that the Master was bored and wanted to challenge it himself, being asked “Did I think it was usual to make an order in those terms?”, responding at random “I suppose it depends what you consider usual” and getting away with it.

 

 

Do you have any tips or advice for current undergraduates?

Yes. Be honest. Do you really love the law, or do you just want to make money? If you really love the law, you will have the most wonderful and rewarding career it is possible to have. If you just want to make money, you would do much better going into banking or other forms of financial services.

 

 

Finally, for our short film ‘here’s to you’ we featured three student heroes – a competitive student, a studious student, and a procrastinator – which character did you most relate to while studying?

I was, and still am, relentlessly competitive: I don’t think it’s a good thing or a bad thing – it’s just the way some of us are made; and we may as well give in to it and try to harness it in constructive directions.

 

Do you have any advice to offer? Email us your interest here.

 

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